Sir John A’s defenders are fighting back: Patrice Dutil in the Toronto Sun

Macdonald is richly deserving of harsh assessments but many people have grown concerned that the criticism has gone too far. Macdonald is being measured against 21st century standards and both his intentions and his administration are being interpreted wrongly and, sometimes, dishonestly, writes Patrice Dutil. By Patrice Dutil, February 8, 2021 In the summer of… Continue reading Sir John A’s defenders are fighting back: Patrice Dutil in the Toronto Sun

Speaking for Ourselves – Shuvaloy Majumdar on Tonight with Jamil Jivani

Munk Senior Fellow Shuvaloy Majumdar joins MLI’s newest Senior Fellow Jamil Jivani to discuss the recent controversy of the John A. Macdonald statue and why it doesn’t represent the wishes of all people of colour in Canada. They also go on to discuss Majumder’s foreign policy career and how this relevant to the diversity of… Continue reading Speaking for Ourselves – Shuvaloy Majumdar on Tonight with Jamil Jivani

John A. Macdonald Under Criticism: David Kilgour for Inside Policy

Let’s focus on the future, which is in our power to shape, not on the past, which can’t be changed, writes David Kilgour. By David Kilgour, September 2, 2020 John A. Macdonald, Canada’s first prime minister in 1867, was born in Glasgow, Scotland and emigrated to Kingston, Upper Canada in 1820. At the age of… Continue reading John A. Macdonald Under Criticism: David Kilgour for Inside Policy

Two Speeches from the Throne, 1866 House of Assembly, Fredericton, New Brunswick First Session, 8 March, 1866

[Ed. After Tilley was thrown out of office in the ill-fated election of 1865, public opinion on Confederation in New Brunswick turned a corner, and in 1866 Tilley was returned to power. Two Speeches from the Throne delivered that year are reproduced below – one by the Anti-Confederation government of Albert Smith, the second by… Continue reading Two Speeches from the Throne, 1866 House of Assembly, Fredericton, New Brunswick First Session, 8 March, 1866

Samuel Leonard Tilley, Speech to Banquet hosted by the Quebec Board of Trade, October 15, 1864

The Honourable Samuel L. Tilley, Provincial Secretary of New Brunswick, responded as follows, on behalf of his Province: He said that the manner in which the toast had been received showed how deep and earnest was the general feeling respecting the grave question on which the Intercolonial Conference was engaged. His friend, the Hon. Dr.… Continue reading Samuel Leonard Tilley, Speech to Banquet hosted by the Quebec Board of Trade, October 15, 1864

Samuel Leonard Tilley, Speech to Banquet honouring Delegates of the Charlottetown Conference, September 12, 1864

The Honourable S.L. Tilley, Provincial Secretary and Leader of the Government of New Brunswick, in replying to the toast on behalf of that Province, said: I must confess that I rise under no ordinary degree of embarrassment tonight. We are summoned here by the representatives of royalty, and surrounded by the ablest men that Canada… Continue reading Samuel Leonard Tilley, Speech to Banquet honouring Delegates of the Charlottetown Conference, September 12, 1864

Sir John A. Macdonald Is Owed Our Thanks — Not Our Derision: Brian Lee Crowley

True patriots love Canada because it has made us (including those who have come to join us from other countries) who we are; and who we are, for all our flaws, is a standard to which much of the rest of the world rightly aspires. Sir John was neither angel nor devil, but a fallible… Continue reading Sir John A. Macdonald Is Owed Our Thanks — Not Our Derision: Brian Lee Crowley

In Defence of Sir John A. Macdonald: Brian Lee Crowley

In the context of recent efforts to eradicate memory of our past, like the City of Victoria’s removal of a statue to Sir John A. Macdonald, William Faulkner’s observation has never been more apt: “The past is never dead. It’s not even past.” Truer words were never spoken about Sir John, Canada’s principal founder and… Continue reading In Defence of Sir John A. Macdonald: Brian Lee Crowley

Tearing Down Sir John A. Macdonald’s Statue Is Not Reconciliation: Brian Lee Crowley

Nothing will dispel the appetite for reconciliation faster than the belief that Canadians who are justly proud of their country must hide these sentiments away and look on silently, while our founders are treated as criminals whose names must never be mentioned in polite company. Put Sir John back in a place of honour, use… Continue reading Tearing Down Sir John A. Macdonald’s Statue Is Not Reconciliation: Brian Lee Crowley

Tearing down statues is not reconciliation: Brian Lee Crowley

Nothing will dispel the appetite for reconciliation faster than the belief that Canadians who are justly proud of their country must hide these sentiments away and look on silently, while our founders are treated as criminals, writes Brian Lee Crowley in the Telegraph-Journal, the Calgary Herald, the Daily Gleaner, the Edmonton Journal, the Vancouver Sun and… Continue reading Tearing down statues is not reconciliation: Brian Lee Crowley